Mesa Specialty Gases and Equipment

About

Started in 1993, MESA International Technologies has provided specialty gas and calibration gas standards used in a wide variety of instrument applications in the refinery and petrochemical industries. Initially, MESA served the international
arena through a series of international partners. March 1, 2001, MESA announced distribution of their products and services in the United States.
QUALITY – Precise manufacturing of calibration gas mixtures involves many critical steps- consideration of chemical raw material purity as well as detailed impurity characterization; calculation of phase behavior for the calibration gas mixture; precise blending; and finally, independent confirming analysis of the final calibration gas mixture. Before starting, requested specialty gas mixes are first evaluated for potential phase problems using advance computer modeling. Following this, the specialty gas mixture is precisely blended to exacting specifications on high sensitivity gravimetric balances. All calibration weights are traceable to the US-NIST. Finally, the specialty gas mixture is analyzed using state-of- the-art analyzers to confirm that the blended and analyzed values agree with each other according to the stated product specifications
CALIBRATION GAS (http://www.mesagas.com/custom-calibration- gas/)
MESA Specialty Gas & Equipment manufacture a broad range of high quality custom calibration gas standards for use in laboratory, R&D, University and industrial analysis applications. Custom calibration gas standards are manufactured using state of the art gravimetric and volumetric tools, scales and highly sensitive instrumentation. Visit our typical mixture component page to see the most common materials available for custom specialty gas mixtures. Several cylinder sizes are also available to meet your specific content requirements. See cylinder specifications to look at the most common available cylinders.

Precise manufacturing of calibration gas mixtures involves many critical steps- consideration of chemical raw material purity as well as detailed impurity characterization; calculation of phase behavior for the calibration gas mixture; precise blending; and finally, independent confirming analysis of the final calibration gas mixture. Before starting, requested specialty gas mixes are first evaluated for potential phase problems using advanced computer modeling. Following this, the specialty gas mixture is precisely blended to exacting specifications on highly sensitive gravimetric scales. All calibration weights are traceable to the US-NIST. Finally, the specialty gas mixture is analyzed using state-of- the-art analyzers to confirm that the blended and analyzed values agree with each other according to the stated product specifications. Each step of the manufacturing process must be constantly measured and validated. At MESA, every product goes through at least seven defined stages during the manufacturing process. From raw material analysis through final mixture certification, results are measured, recorded, and then compared to strict quality control requirements based on each individual mixture. Several stages of the manufacturing process contain proprietary techniques perfected during our 30+ years' experience of specialty gas manufacturing.

What is the difference between different specialty gas manufacturers?
Many specialty gas manufactures fail to monitor these steps closely enough to provide truly accurate calibration gas standards. Raw materials are accepted and adjusted according to the provider's specification sheet. This information is frequently misstated or inaccurate. Also, sub-par raw materials are often used in the manufacturing of specialty gases. This not only compromises the accuracy of the specialty gas, but could impact critical components on your analyzer. MESA starts with high purity raw materials and carefully analyzes each pure gas for potential impurities. This ensures a quality calibration gas standard that is manufactured free of unwanted impurities.

Careful analysis of the calibration gas standard inter-compared with multiple standards is a critical step in the specialty gas manufacturing process. Many companies may have few internal standards to inter-compare. Other companies may inter-compare with internal standards that fail to strictly optimize some of the critical phases mentioned above. The result can be an inaccurate standard confirmed by GC analysis. If both mixtures did not optimize the steps mentioned above, then the re Gas Chromatagraphsult is often a confirmed, but an inaccurate calibration gas standard is produced. At MESA, we use both
internal standards and reputable 3rd party manufacturers to inter-compare our calibration gas mixtures. This is an additional quality control step to ensure a reliable calibration gas standard has been manufactured.

Cylinder preparation is another critical step often overlooked. Cylinder preparation should be based on the individual calibration gas mixture. Many manufacturers take a single approach to cylinder preparation, often resulting in less than optimal conditions for the calibration gas standard. Over the years, MESA has developed several proprietary techniques for cylinder preparation, making sure that each cylinder has been prepared to optimize the
performance of your specialty gas mixture.

Filling techniques vary greatly. Commitment to quality is the engine that drives our filling techniques. MESA constantly
evaluates new filling methods to determine which techniques produce the most accurate results. Our continuous evaluations of new techniques ensure that you will receive the most accurate calibration gas standards available in the market.

It is the business of MESA Specialty Gases & Equipment to market and provide quality specialty gases, equipment and
chemicals delivered direct, and/or through our worldwide distribution partners. It is our guiding principle that only the highest quality products will be offered to our customers. We emphasize that only excellent customer service will allow our profitable growth in this highly competitive industry.

ENVIRONMENTAL GAS STANDARDS
(http://www.mesagas.com/environmental-gas- standards/)
MESA Specialty Gases & Equipment provides a number of Environmental Gas standards used to ensure environmental
safety, compliance and meet regulatory requirements. MESA Specialty Gases & Equipment produces environmental gases to
meet the unique needs in the following areas:

Standards for CEM and Stack Gas Monitoring
Automotive Exhaust Emission Standards
Ambient Air Monitoring Standards
Low Level NO Mixtures
EPA Protocol Gases

The following list indicates the most common components used in our mixtures. If you do not see the component you require, please contact us to check availability:
AMMONIA
OXYGEN
CARBON DIOXIDE
PROPANE
HYDROGEN SULFIDE
SULFUR DIOXIDE
METHANE
VARIOUS MERCAPTANS
NITRIC OXIDE

Pollution
Air pollution is the presence of any chemical, physical (e.g. particulate matter), or biological agent that modifies the
natural characteristics of the atmosphere. The atmosphere is a complex, dynamic natural gaseous system that is
essential to support life on planet earth. Enforced air quality standards, like the Clean Air Act in the United States, have reduced the presence of some pollutants. While major stationary sources are often identified with air pollution, the greatest sources of
emissions are actually mobile sources, primarily cars. There are many available air pollution control technologies and urban planning strategies available to reduce air pollution; however, worldwide costs of addressing the issue are high.

Sources
Air pollutants are classified as either directly released or formed by subsequent chemical reactions. A direct release air pollutant is one that is emitted directly from a given source, such as the carbon monoxide or sulfur dioxide, all of which are byproducts of combustion; whereas, a subsequent air pollutant is formed in the atmosphere through chemical reactions involving direct release pollutants. The formation of ozone in photochemical smog is the most important example of a subsequent air pollutant.

Anthropogenic sources (human activity) related to burning different kinds of fuel, bullet Chemicals, dust and cropwaste burning in farming,

Combustion-fired power plants.

Fumes from paint, varnish, aerosol sprays and other solvents.

Controlled burn practices used in agriculture and forestry
management

Waste deposition in landfills, which generate methane

Motor vehicles generating air pollution emissions.

Natural Sources
Marine vessels, such as container ships or cruise ships, and related port air emissions

Dust from natural sources, usually large areas of land with little or no vegetation.

Burning fossil fuels bullet Methane, emitted by the digestion of food by animals, for example cattle.

Burning wood, fireplaces, stoves, furnaces and incinerators

Pine trees, which emit volatile organic compounds (VOCs).

Other anthropogenic sources bull
t Radon gas from radioactive decay within the Earth's crust.

Oil refining, power plant operation and indus
rial activity in general.

Smoke and carbon monoxide from wildfires.

Volcanic activity, which produce sulfur, chlorine, and asH particulates.

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